Our work

Our work

Our goal is to contribute to a nature-positive, net-zero future for the fashion industry.

Beautiful natural scenery of river in southeast Asia. Tropical green forest with mountains in background, aerial view drone shot.

In order to reach this industry-wide goal, we work towards: 

Mitigating
Mitigating

climate changethrough the implementation of Science Based Targets for Climate to achieve net-zero by 2050.

Targets:

  • Achieving 100% renewable energy across own operations by 2030
  • Ensuring that 25% of key raw materials are lower climate impact on 2025
  • Members are required to have set targets across scope 1, 2 and 3 (validated by SBTi or UNFCCC approved alternatives)
Restoring
Restoring

biodiversity through strategies aligned with Science Based Targets for Nature.

Targets:

  • Developing individual biodiversity blueprints, research and capacity building
  • Supporting zero deforestation and sustainable forest management by 2025
Protecting
Protecting

oceans and freshwater from the industry’s negative impact through solutions that address pollution from upstream textile production and plastic packaging.

Targets:

  • Eliminating problematic and unnecessary plastic in B2C packaging by 2025 and B2B by 2030
  • Ensuring at least half of all plastic packaging is 100% recycled content, by 2025 for B2C and by 2030 for B2B

Achieving results of this scale can only be done by transforming the industry’s entire system. And our conviction is that working collectively to reach key tipping points* will trigger the necessary large-scale change. We use these tipping points to provide a framework for all our work and to shape our areas of action.

Positive tipping points (PTP) can be defined as a change in a system or subsystem, which becomes self-reinforcing beyond a critical threshold, and which leads to substantial, frequently abrupt and often irreversible impacts that are predominantly beneficial.

 

Source – The Global Tipping Points Report, led by Professor Tim Lenton from the University of Exeter’s Global Systems Institute with the support of more than 200 researchers from over 90 organisations in 26 countries. Partners – Bezos Earth Fund, University of Exeter’s Global Systems Institute, Earth Commission Global Commons Alliance, Systems Change Lab, SYSTEMIQ.

Areas of action

XXX

Lower Impact Production

The fashion industry is one of the largest contributors to global carbon emissions, with its upstream energy-intensive textile production, currently heavily reliant on fossil fuels. Understanding the landscape and identifying the main drivers of impact are critical to mitigating the industry’s environmental footprint.
XXX

Lower Impact Materials

Fashion is far more than just the final product. To truly tackle the industry’s impact, we need to look at every element of production. And that means starting at the very beginning, looking at the raw materials that go on to become garments and ensuring that their impact is as low as possible.
XXX

Nature Positive Actions

Biodiversity is essential to supporting all life on Earth but declining at a faster rate than ever before in human history. Simply reducing the fashion industry’s negative impact is no longer an option. It needs to be flipped to make positive change and actively restore nature.
XXX

Renewable Energy

The fashion industry can no longer be powered by fossil fuels. The 2021 IPCC report called for immediate, large-scale reductions in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions but current industry-level measures are insufficient. A mass transition to renewable energy is essential.

A FASHION INDUSTRY COMPASS

A guide to reimagine the future of the fashion industry.

Our areas of action are guided by a fashion industry compass designed in collaboration with MIT Fabric Innovation Hub. This compass is a tool to guide the industry on a unique path to reduce negative impacts. A tool that will evolve over time as the industry improves. It is an invitation for companies to align goals and move forward collectively. This journey can start in any direction of the compass as areas are interconnected. This is where collective action is needed in order to shift towards positive industry-wide transformation towards a net zero and nature positive future.

You will find above a few examples of projects The Fashion Pact is leading with its members.

Our process

We follow a science-based methodology to create change on an industry level. Our process follows four steps from start to shift: 

Scroll down to see the different steps.

1
2
3
4

Industry Mapping with experts to identify white spaces in the fashion industry where collective efforts have the greatest impact.

CEO Input to decide which white spaces we target and actions we will develop to address critical issues.

Collective Movement to provide guidance and tools for members to build knowledge and capacity.

Joint Actions to pilot pioneering collective solutions with our members in key focus areas.

TRACKING PROGRESS

As part of our commitment to continuous improvement and traceability, members of The Fashion Pact report annually on their progress towards our shared targets.

We work in partnership with Textile Exchange to incorporate our reporting in its Materials Benchmark, ensuring alignment with existing industry efforts.

Together with our members, we drive initiatives directly related to our targets, and our vision for a net-zero, nature-positive future for fashion.

Two out of every three members already have either committed to or have in place Science-Based Targets. We know however that more is needed and we are actively developing new approaches to strengthen reporting and accountability. These will be introduced in 2024.

 

 

0 %

have a biodiversity strategy in 2022 vs 10% in 2020.

0 %

have sourcing restrictions (avoidance measures including no deforestation) for nature-related impacts in 2022 vs 36% in 2021.

0 %

have a zero deforestation and land use conversion policy in 2022.

Source: Textile Exchange’s 2023 Materials Benchmark.

Respondents’ Base: 76% of total members.

0 %

of the total scope 1 and 2 energy consumption by members comes from renewable sources.

0 %

have started to evaluate the climate impact of their priority fibres and materials in 2022.

0 %

have SBTi GHG emissions targets aligned with a 1.5°C of warming vs 53% in 2021.

Source: Textile Exchange’s 2023 Materials Benchmark.

Respondents’ Base: 76% of total members.

0 %

have reduced their share of unnecessary and problematic packaging within their total plastics packaging volume in 2022 vs 52% in 2021.

0 %

have increased their share of plastic packaging incorporating recycled content vs 55% in 2021.

0 %

are working on achieving plastic packaging with 100% recycled content vs 67% in 2021.

Source: Textile Exchange’s 2023 Materials Benchmark.

Respondents’ Base: 76% of total members.

Tools & resources

We share our findings and learnings as open-source resources that support the industry in its journey towards transformation.

 

Click on any of the links below to find out more.

Skip to content